COURSES

COURSES

The courses listed below include courses required for degree programs and electives. Required M.Div. 100 level courses are offered annually. 200-300 level AP, NT, OT courses are offered annually. 200-300 level CH and ST courses are offered every two years. Electives are offered on a variable schedule. Course numbers ending xx1 are offered in fall semesters, courses ending xx2 are January intensives, courses ending xx3 are offered in spring semesters, courses ending xx0 are summer courses.

OLD TESTAMENT
NEW TESTAMENT
CHURCH HISTORY
SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY
APOLOGETICS
PRACTICAL THEOLOGY
M.A. COURSES NOT APPLICABLE TO M.DIV./M.A.R. PROGRAMS

OLD TESTAMENT DEPARTMENT

It must be apparent to anyone who reads the Gospels carefully that Jesus Christ, in the days of his flesh, looked upon that body of writings which is known as the Old Testament as constituting an organic whole. To him the Scriptures were a harmonious unit which bore a unique message and witness.
– E. J. Young

Nothing is more foundational to Christian ministry than a full-orbed knowledge and embrace of the gospel. The Old Testament department is committed to teaching the first thirty-nine books of the Bible, with all the aspects entailed, as the anticipation of the glorious climactic fulfillment of redemption in Jesus Christ. To this end, the Old Testament curriculum enables students:

To acquire a reading knowledge of biblical Hebrew
To acquire a knowledge of the content of the Old Testament
To grapple with the challenges of biblical interpretation
To evaluate the ways in which the Old Testament has been interpreted in the past
To perceive the unity of the Old and New Testaments and the hermeneutical significance of their unity
To understand and value the historical context in which God gave his redemptive revelation, how it began in the Old Testament period and then culminated in the glorious and extraordinary climax to that history in Christ and his work in Christ as interpreted in the New Testament
To identify the major biblical-theological themes of the Old Testament and to recognize their importance for understanding the gospel
To develop skill in understanding and applying each of the books of the Old Testament
To learn to communicate the gospel through the Old Testament
To be encouraged to embrace the gospel in continuing and vital ways through the glory of God’s self-disclosure and to fear the Lord and love him with the whole heart
OT011 Hebrew I
Purpose of Hebrew I, II, III: To teach students elements of the Hebrew language; to expose the student to a significant amount of biblical Hebrew through extensive translation of portions of the Hebrew Bible; to prepare the student for further exegetical work in Old Testament courses. Topics covered include orthography, phonemics, morphology, and syntax. The third semester is devoted to extensive reading and translation of narrative and poetic materials from the Hebrew Bible. 3 semester hours. Auditing not permitted. (M.Div. requirement)

OT012 Hebrew II
Two semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

OT013 Hebrew III
Four semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

OT113 OT Introduction
Purpose: To introduce students to the complex hermeneutical, theological, and doctrinal issues surrounding OT interpretation. Topics covered in the course include the history of the Hebrew text; the use of the OT in the Pseudepigrapha, Apocrypha, and NT; the major critical methods and postmodern interpretation; and Biblical Theology. Prerequisite, Hebrew I or equivalent completed or in progress. 3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

OT211 Old Testament History and Theology I
Purpose: To provide an introduction to the theology of the Pentateuch; to engage in the exegesis of selected passages from the Pentateuch with particular attention to their relationship to ancient Near Eastern literature, the theology of the Pentateuch as a whole, and to the history of redemption as it reaches its climax in the gospel. Topics covered include the narrative structure of the Bible, the Pentateuch and the history of redemption, Genesis 1-3 as an entry point to biblical theology, and the book of Exodus. Prerequisites Hebrew III or equivalent and NT 123. 3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

OT223 Old Testament History and Theology II
Purpose: To explore the relationship among literature, history and theology in the books of Deuteronomy through Ezra/Nehemiah; to provide a knowledge of the content of this section of canon; to give a biblical-theological framework for using these books in life and ministry. In addition to laying out the theology and content of each of these books, we will cover such topics as the relationship of Deuteronomy to the other books. Additional topics covered include OT historiography; OT theology; the relationship between revelation, history, and theology; and covenant. Prerequisites, Hebrew III and NT 123. 3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

OT311 Old Testament Prophetical Books
Purpose: To provide knowledge of the content of this portion of the canon; to study the role of the Hebrew prophets in Israelite society and the nature of Israelite prophecy; to give a biblical-theological framework to understand the prophetic books in life and ministry. Topics covered include the structure, content, and theology of the prophetic books and Daniel, the ancient Near Eastern setting of prophecy, the history of interpretation of the prophetic literature, and the role of the prophets in redemptive history. A portion of the course involves seminar discussions with the professor. Prerequisites, Hebrew III and NT 123. 3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

OT323 Old Testament Poetry and Wisdom
Purpose: To gain a strong familiarity with the nature of Hebrew poetry; to explore the theological context of the wisdom books (Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes), Psalms, and Song of Songs; to discuss the theology of OT wisdom vis-à-vis the gospel. Topics covered in the course include the nature and diversity of OT wisdom books; characteristics of Hebrew poetry; exegetical studies of various psalms, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Songs; and wisdom and the NT. Prerequisites, Hebrew III and NT 123. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

NEW TESTAMENT DEPARTMENT

To accept the New Testament as canonical is, in a word, to acknowledge the twenty-seven writings in the second part of the Holy Bible as possessing divine authority and as constituting, accordingly, an integral part of the divine rule for faith and life… There is implicit in the claim of canonicity, therefore, the judgment that divine inspiration has constituted these writings with a quality that sets them apart from all merely human writings. Those who accept this high view of the New Testament, accordingly, do not shrink from identifying it as the Word of God, the infallible and inerrant rule of faith and life. – Ned B. Stonehouse

The New Testament is the account of the presence of the kingdom of heaven, and centers in the person of Jesus Christ. This is the cornerstone for all Christian ministry. The New Testament department is committed to teaching the New Testament, with all of the aspects entailed, as the full revelation of the covenant of God’s grace in Jesus Christ. To this end, the New Testament curriculum enables students:

To acquire a reading knowledge of New Testament Greek
To understand and value the historical context in which God accomplished his work in Christ, and through which he gave us the New Testament
To perceive the unity of the Old and New Testaments and the hermeneutical significance thereof
To grapple with the challenges of biblical interpretation
To recognize major biblical-theological themes of the New Testament and their importance for understanding the biblical message
To evaluate the ways in which the New Testament has been interpreted in the past
To develop skill in understanding and applying each of the books of the New Testament
NT011 Greek I
Purpose of Greek I, II, III: To prepare students for fur ther work in the New Testament by giving them a reading knowledge of Koiné Greek. The course is designed for beginners; no prior knowledge of Greek is assumed. The students will cover the basics of grammar and acquire a core vocabulary. During the last semester students will do recitations from the Greek New Testament and be introduced to the issues of syntax. 4 semester hours. Auditing not permitted. (M.Div. requirement)

NT012 Greek II
3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

NT013 Greek III
3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

NT101/3 Text of the NT
Purpose: To provide students with the historical, technical and theological framework requisite for responsible examination and use of the Greek text of the New Testament including consideratoin of textual transmission and textual criticism. 1 semester hour. Prerequisite, Greek III or equivalent completed or in progress. (M.Div. requirement) [Formerly, this course was included as a third hour of NT111 but has been separated to allow students to satisfy the more advanced prerequisite of Greek III.]
NT111 General Introduction to the NT
Purpose: To provide students with the historical and literary framework requisite for responsible New Testament interpretation. The purpose of this course is to survey introductory matters that apply to the New Testament as a whole: historical and linguistic background, inscripturation and canon formation. The general approach to these issues is historical, but with an underlying concern for the theological dimensions of each. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

NT123 Biblical Hermeneutics: OT and NT
Purpose: To grow in skill in understanding, interpreting, and applying the Bible. Topics covered include prolegomena to biblical interpretation, principles and practice of biblical interpretation, and the question of hermeneutics in the historical-critical tradition. Prerequisites, Hebrew III completed or in progress, Greek III completed or in progress, and NT 111. 4 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

NT211 NT Interpretation: The Gospels
Purpose: to develop an initial framework of understanding for interpreting and applying the canonical Gospels; to familiarize students with the Gospels’ description of the earthly ministry and teaching of Jesus Christ, and to enable them to understand and apply the theology of the Gospels in ministry. Topics covered include a selective survey and critique of historical-critical investigation of the Gospels, questions of special introduction, an overview of the content and theology of Jesus’ actions and teaching, and an examination of the character and special emphases of each canonical Gospel. Prerequisites, Greek III or equivalent, Hebrew III or equivalent, NT 111 and NT 123. 4 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

NT223 NT Interpretation: The Book of Acts and the Pauline Epistles,
Purpose: To deepen understanding of Acts and the letters of Paul. Topics covered include questions of special introduction, and basic themes in the theology of Acts and the letters of Paul. Prerequisites, Greek III or equivalent, Hebrew III or equivalent, NT 111. 4 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

NT311 NT Interpretation: The General Epistles and Revelation
Purpose: to introduce the particular character of Revelation and the General Epistles, to enable students to understand these books so that they can apply their teaching to their own lives and in their ministry. This course will deal with questions of special introduction, and will include the exegesis of selected passages in order to establish the structure and distinctive themes of these books. Prerequisites, Greek III or equivalent, Hebrew III or equivalent, NT 111 and NT 123. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

CHURCH HISTORY DEPARTMENT

It has been well said that people make histor y, but they do not make the history that they choose. All human beings act in particular times, in particular places, and for a variety of different reasons. The aim of the Church History department is to teach students to understand the way in which human action is shaped by historical, social, economic, cultural, and theological concerns; and by so doing to allow the students to understand better their own positions as those who act in context. Though we live in an anti-historical age, the Church History department is committed to helping students realize the liberating importance of having a solid grasp of those historical trajectories which shape, often in hidden ways, the life of the church in the present. To that end, the Church History curriculum enables students:

To recognize the ambiguities and complexities of human history
To examine themselves in the light of the past
To engage with an epistemologically self-conscious historical methodology
To see how the church’s testimony to Christ has been preserved and articulated through the ages
To recognize turning points in the history of the church
To identify major types and paradigms of Christian vision in societies past and present
To be well acquainted with the Reformed heritage
To recognize global patterns in the spread of the gospel through missions
To cultivate a modesty with regard to their own times and cultures by setting these within the perspective of the great sweep of church history
To be inspired by what they learn to proclaim God’s grace to today’s world.
CH211 Ancient Church History
Purpose: To introduce students to the major events, personalities, and ideas which shaped the life and thought of the early church; to encourage students to think historically about the church’s past; to enable students to read the major texts of the early church Fathers for themselves. Topics and personalities covered include the first-century background, the Apostolic Fathers, Irenaeus, Tertullian, Origen, trinitarian and christological debates, Augustine, the rise of monasticism, and martyrdom. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

CH223 Medieval Church History
Purpose: To introduce students to the major events, people, and ideas, which shaped the doctrine and life of the medieval church; to introduce students to some major writings of the time; to help students understand how the philosophical and theological issues of the late Middle Ages helped shape the direction and focus of the Protestant and Reformed heritage. Topics and people covered include the re-evangelization of northern Europe, the increasing centralization of the church, the roles of tradition and canon law, the development of theories of the atonement, the influence of Aristotelian and anti-Aristotelian philosophy on the development of views of the application of redemption, the dissolution of the medieval world and the humanistic response as providing the context for the Reformation; Charlemagne, saints Boniface, Anselm, Abelard, Francis, Dominic, Thomas and Scotus, Ockham, Erasmus. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

CH311 Reformation Church
Purpose: to introduce students to the major events, personalities, and ideas which shaped the Reformation of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, to encourage students to think historically about the church’s past, to enable students to read major theological texts from the Reformation for themselves. Topics and personalities covered include the late medieval context, Martin Luther, John Calvin, justification by faith, anabaptism, the Catholic Reformation, the Anglican settlements, and the rise of Puritanism. 3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

CH323 The Church in the Modern Age
Purpose: to introduce students to the major events, people, and cultural developments which shaped the doctrine and life of the post-Reformation church; to introduce students to some major writings of the time; to introduce students to the challenges to the Christian faith from new directions in the social, political, and philosophical climate; to relate American history and culture to modern Christianity; to introduce students to the globalization of Christianity in the modern missionary movement; to help students understand the continuing relevance of Calvinism and its ongoing discovery of biblical truth. Topics and people covered include the Enlightenment and Deism, Awakening methods and theology, the role of small groups, Romanticism, divisions and realignments within Protestantism and Calvinism, American Presbyterianism, Fundamentalism, Modernism, Neo-orthodoxy, New Evangelicalism, the Orthodox Presbyterian Church, and the Presbyterian Church of America; Erskine, Zinzendorf, Spener, Wesley, Whitefield, Edwards, Witherspoon, Schleiermacher, Ritschl, Hodge, Kuyper, Barth, and Machen. 4 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

CH 461 American Presbyterianism
Purpose: To explore developments from the colonial period till the present, including interactions with the American philosophical and cultural climate; to study the nature and role of revival in the church and society. Special attention to Southern and New England concerns, responses to urbanization, and the rise of Liberalism. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY DEPARTMENT

The task of systematic theology is to set forth in orderly and coherent manner the truth respecting God and his relations to men and the world. This truth is derived from the data of revelation, and revelation comprises all those media by which God makes himself and his will known to us men. All other departments of theological discipline contribute their findings to systematic theology and it brings all the wealth of knowledge derived from these disciplines to bear upon the more inclusive systematization which it undertakes. – John Murray

Systematic theology seeks rightly to divide the Word of truth, particularly the holy Scriptures. It aims at formulations which correctly understand the Scriptures, through proper exegesis, and applies those formulations to the needs of the church and the issues of the day. To that end, the Systematic Theology curriculum enables students:

To understand and be able to articulate “the whole counsel of God” in the form of the system of doctrine taught in Scripture
To grasp the way this system of doctrine derives from sound interpretation that does justice to the unity of Scripture in its historical and authorial diversity
To understand the history of doctrine, primarily the theological heritage of the Reformed Churches and their confessional documents, especially the Westminster Standards
To recognize within the theological heritage of the Reformed Churches what is perennial and undoubted and what is not yet settled
To value the Westminster Standards as a summary of the system of doctrine taught in Scripture and, where appropriate, be prepared ex animo to subscribe to them as such
To embrace the system of doctrine taught in Scripture in a way that enhances devotion to God and service to the church and the world, and so, in all, “to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge”
ST101 Introduction to Systematic Theology
Purpose: to provide foundations for the study of theology, particularly for deepening understanding of the teaching of Scripture as a whole and in its unity. Topics covered in the course include nature, method, and sources of theology; revelation and the inspiration of Scripture. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

ST113 Doctrine of God
Purpose: To grasp that we can know nothing of God except he first revealed himself to us; to recognize that the doctrine of God (theology proper) seeks to unpack the teaching of Scripture and not directly the problems set by philosophy; to value those ecumenical creeds of the church which give classic expression to vital elements of the doctrine of God, and whose doctrine is evident in the Westminster Standards; to embrace the doctrine of God not as a bare set of propositions but as the very personal knowledge of God so essential to worship and service and so characteristic of a Reformed world and life view. Topics covered in the course include nature, method, and sources of theology; revelation and the inspiration of Scripture. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)
ST211 Doctrine of Man
Purpose: To enable students to understand and to value their identity as made in God’s image, as they see that image in Jesus Christ; to think of “self-esteem” in a biblical way, as “boasting in weakness”; to enable students to recognize the guilt and misery of their sin; and how that is removed by God’s love expressed in Christ and his work; to understand what is crucial about the relation between the imputation of Adam’s sin and the imputation of Christ’s righteousness; to learn more of the skills involved in graduate research. Topics covered in this course include Reformed and other understandings of the image of God; dichotomy and trichotomy; biblical aspects of personality; covenant relationship to God; New England, Princeton, and Southern understandings of the imputation of Adam’s sin; law and gospel as basis of the knowledge of sin; inability; forgiveness of others. Prerequisite, Hebrew III completed or in progress and Greek III or equivalent. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

ST223 Doctrine of Salvation I
Purpose: To deepen understanding of the salvation accomplished by the triune God in Christ in both its central focus and comprehensive scope. Topics covered include plan of salvation, covenant of grace, person and work of Christ. Prerequisite, Hebrew II and Greek III or equivalent. 3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

ST313 Doctrine of Salvation II
Purpose: To understand and be able to articulate the application of redemption, the sacraments, and the last things; to recognize how emphases running throughout the curriculum (redemptive history, union with Christ, and authorial diversity) come together in our understanding of the order or application of salvation; to reflect on Calvin’s doctrine of salvation, thereby learning the necessity of a sympathetic-critical reading of the soteriology of the Westminster Standards; to learn how best to proclaim the gospel and to defend a Reformed understanding of it. Topics covered in the course include the history and order/application of salvation and union with Christ: its context (effectual calling, regeneration, and pneumatological union); its benefits (justification, adoption, sanctification); its realization (faith and repentance); its sacraments (baptism and the Lord’s Supper); its certainty (assurance and perseverance/preservation); and its consummation (the last things). Prerequisites, Hebrew III, or equivalent, and Greek III, or equivalent, completed or in progress. 4 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

ST323 Christian Ethics
Purpose: to study and reflect on our obligations toward God’s revealed will; to arrive at certain convictions about key moral issues facing the church today; to grow in wisdom, the ability to discern good and evil in every situation. Topics covered include the biblical foundation for ethics, an introduction to different types of ethical systems, hermeneutical questions, Christians and the public square, sanctification, the clash of obligations, calling, stewardship, sexual ethics, bioethical issues, race matters, ethics in cyberspace, just war theory, and ecology. Prerequisite, Hebrew III and Greek III or equivalent. 4 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

ST530 The Westminster Standards
Purpose: To exposit the theology of the Assembly by means of a study of the Westminster Confession of Faith. Topics covered in the course include the origin and convening of the Westminster Assembly. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

APOLOGETICS DEPARTMENT

Every form of intellectual argument rests, in the last analysis, upon one or the other of two basic presuppositions. The non-Christian’s process of reasoning rests upon the presupposition that man is the final or ultimate reference point in human predication. The Christian’s process of reasoning rests upon the presupposition that God, speaking through Christ by his Spirit in the infallible Word, is the final or ultimate reference point in human predication. – Cornelius Van Til

Apologetics is a theological discipline that seeks to defend and commend the Christian faith. The apologetic tradition of Westminster attempts to apply Reformed theology to the challenges that confront Christianity and the church. Apologetics is an indispensable preparation for gospel ministry and for evangelism. To that end, the Apologetics curriculum enables students:

To understand biblical religion as a world-and-life view, rather than a set of isolated truths
To develop arguments which address the deepest levels of various worldviews
To articulate biblical principles for the defense and commendation of the gospel of Jesus Christ in evangelism
To understand the patterns and cultural trends of our times
To develop answers to some of the most frequent challenges raised against Christian faith
To know something of the history of thought
To be familiar with some of the most articulate apologists throughout history
To articulate the relationship between faith and reason
AP101 Introduction to Apologetics
Purpose: to introduce students to Christian apologetics, to learn the art of presuppositional argument, to learn how to lift up Christ and give reasons for the hope that we have (1 Peter 3:15), to develop tools in order to understand the surrounding culture. Topics covered in the course include the biblical and theological basis for apologetics, informal logic and the nature of argument, developing a world and life view, presuppositionalism, and the application of apologetics to problems in philosophy. 3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

AP213 Christian Apologetics
Purpose: To build on the principles established in AP 101; to establish the Scriptural warrant for the Christian faith; to understand the place and importance of evidences in apologetics; to establish biblical principles necessary for a defense of Christianity. Topics covered in this course include the nature and structure of arguments, an in-depth analysis and critique of some of the traditional proofs for the existence of God, and the necessity of a Reformed doctrine of revelation for apologetics. Prerequisite, AP 101 and Greek III or equivalent completed or in progress. 3 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY DEPARTMENT

The Department of Practical Theology exists to apply biblical exegesis and theology in the formation of godly and competent practitioners who can minister God’s unchanging Word to our changing world. To that end, the Practical Theology curriculum enables students:

To be faithful and effective preachers of God’s Word to the present generation
To shepherd the flock to which they have been called
To minister the Word through biblical counseling
To spread the good news of the kingdom of God in word and in deed in the task of evangelism and world missions
To develop the realm of Christian education both within and without the church context
To exercise gifts of leadership in various ministries
To understand the church of Jesus Christ, its functions, its needs, and the variety of ministries into which leaders are called.
PT 013P English Bible Survey
Purpose: To provide a thorough survey of the content of the English Bible; to equip future church leaders with skills for teaching the English Bible in the local church; to meet the requirement of passing the English Bible examination. Topics covered include the reading of the entire English Bible, written exercises, class discussion, and laboratory experience in study methods. No auditing permitted. Non-credit (class meets two hours per week).

PT021 Mentored Ministry Integration Seminar
Purpose: to discuss the integration of biblical and theological principles to ministry situations, to provide a workshop in which each student will present one case from an actual ministry experience, to learn to analyze problems, apply biblical principles, and propose appropriate solutions in the context of lively class discussions. Students in the M.Div. program are required to take this seminar twice; $200 fee per seminar. Non-credit (class meets one hour per week). (M.Div. requirement)

PT111 Orientation to Ministry
Purpose: to receive an introduction to the comprehensive picture of preparation for kingdom ministry, including the biblical qualifications for those who would serve as shepherds of God’s flock, to understand the powerful ministry dynamic of Spirit and Word to transform lives, to remember the central role of a vital walk with the Lord to effective ministry (Spiritual Formation), to understand the steps necessary to achieve perceived ministry goals (Professional Formation), to understand and analyze the “call” to ministry, to receive an introduction to the Mentored Ministry program, to receive an introduction to the design of the Practical Theology curriculum, to complete the Ministry Preparation Contract designed to coordinate the resources of the Seminary and the church with one’s comprehensive preparation for effective kingdom service. Topics covered in this course include calling to ministry, the minister’s family life, and spiritual formation, using various approaches to learning, including readings, response papers, and interaction with “Pastors Panels” in which experienced clergy will interact with the class on important topics such as “Call to Ministry” and “The Minister’s Family Life.” This course is required for all first-year M.Div. students. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

PT123 Gospel Communication
Purpose: To introduce the student to the basic elements of good sermon construction; to initiate practice in the skills of preparing sermons; to expose the student to various preaching models. Topics covered in this course include a biblical theology of preaching and gospel communication; the spiritual principles of proclaiming the gospel; the form of the message; studies in text and theme selection, exegesis, structure, and delivery. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

PT211 The Doctrine of the Church
Purpose: to strengthen the student’s commitment to and service in the local church and to God, to articulate a clear understanding of the Reformed doctrine of the church, to aid the student in building a philosophy of ministry for the twenty-first century. Topics covered in this course include a biblical theology of the church; the marks, attributes, and mission of the church; form of government; women’s role in the church; gifts; and church discipline. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

PT Elective Puritan Pastoral Theology
Purpose: To acquaint the student with the pastoral theology of the Puritans of the 17th century; to enrich the student’s appreciation of the pastoral concerns of Puritan theology; to explore the forms and methods of pastoral ministry practiced by the Puritans; to deepen the student’s preaching through a consideration of the role of preaching in Puritan pastoral ministry; to compare the modern practice of ministry with that of the 17th century. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PT332 Seminar in Leadership
Purpose: To examine biblical principles of leadership; to evaluate one’s leadership gifts, style, and strength; to discuss practical leadership models and methods within the local church. Topics covered in this course include characteristics of godly leaders, how to develop a ministry model, the importance of planning, practical pointers on leading a session and a congregation, a resume primer, and factors in evaluating a pastoral call. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PT343 Mission of the Church
Purpose: To instill a passion and commitment for the mission of Christ’s church in the world; to enable the articulation of how the mission of Christ is taught throughout the Scriptures; to equip with models for leading the church in its missions program; to equip with models for leading the church in its educational program; to enable the leadership in a church’s evangelistic outreach. Topics covered include a biblical theory of mission, issues in world evangelization, building a missions program for the local church, contextualization, education and the church, curriculum design, and building evangelistic outreach for the local church. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PT363 Orientation to Pastoral Counseling
Purpose: to help students develop a functional, biblical counseling worldview; to help students understand the importance of heart change as a methodological goal; to develop an understanding of the role of Scripture in biblical counseling; to highlight and practice the critical skills for effectiveness in biblical counseling. Topics covered include how to build a counseling relationship, how to gather and interpret data, how to function as an agent of repentance, and how to guide and assist others as they seek to apply change to daily life. 2 semester hours. (M.Div. requirement)

PT372 Worship Purpose: To deepen the students’ biblical and theological understanding of public worship; to familiarize students with historic patterns of Christian worship; to help students develop a vision for a worshiping congregation; to encourage students to be thoughtful, joyful worshipers of the triune God; to provide students with resources as they plan and lead public worship. Topics covered include biblical-theological foundations of worship, the directive principle of worship as outlined in the Westminster Standards, the role of the means of grace in worship, contextualization and worship, music and worship, and contemporary issues with regard to worship. 1 semester hour. (Elective)

PT421 Theological Bibliography and Research Methodology
Purpose: To study research methods and librar y use designed for graduate level writing in the theological disciplines; to provide some awareness of bibliographical form and style; to have a sense of what academic research involves, what it takes; to write a scholarly article, and what skills are needed for first-rate scholarly work; to be able to solve, with reference to notes, particular research problems; to produce footnotes, bibliography, and typewritten text in accord with SBL and Westminster guidelines (with assistance from Turabian); to locate and utilize materials in the seminary’s library as well as other libraries. Topics covered include goals of research and academic standards, orientation to the basic features of library and research, bibliographical guides, bibliographies, encyclopedias, special publication formats, serials and periodical indexes, form and style, biblical studies, church history, systematic theology, practical theology, making a bibliography, and use of computers for research. 1 semester hour. (Elective)

PT433 Introduction to Youth and Campus Ministry
Purpose: To provide a theological foundation for youth and campus ministry; to provide models of ministry that will help students do theological and missiological reflection; to provide students with skills in engaging youth in their context; to examine existing models of youth and campus ministry in order to develop the students’ style and form of ministry. Topics covered are theological foundations of youth and campus ministry, major issues in youth and campus ministry, the church and the importance of youth and campus ministry, discipling youth, and the importance of para-church organizations. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PT551 Preaching Seminar
Purpose: To create an appreciation for expository teaching, to enhance the student’s skill for choosing, understanding, and structuring a biblical text for the purpose of preaching, to provide an opportunity to practice those skills, to encourage critical reflection upon the student’s own preaching for continuing development. Topics covered in this course include analysis of various sermon forms and structures; unity, movement, and purpose in sermon construction; and grace dynamics of Christian preaching. Two expository messages will be preached and videotaped by each student and evaluated by the professor. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PT564 Pastoral Theology of Jonathan Edwards
Purpose: To examine the role of the pastor as evangelist and revivalist; specifically, we will examine the Biblical model for this kind of ministry with a specific focus on the revivalistic writings and sermons of the Puritan pastor/theologian/philosopher Jonathan Edwards (1703–58). The course will be text-based. By a close reading of several of Edwards’ major treatises, in addition to several lesser ones (i.e., sermons and short works), it is hoped that the student will gain a depth of understanding that is not possible in a more broadly-based survey course. The principle texts for the course will be Religious Affections, Freedom of the Will, Original Sin, True Virtue, and The End for which the World was Created. Sermons and other selections have been chosen that contribute to an understanding of the central themes of these texts. The Goals of the Course: (A) that the student will come to some awareness of the issues that stirred Jonathan Edwards to take up his quill by entering into his life and the issues of the eighteenth century; (B) that the student in understanding Edwards’ conception of such crucial doctrines as the nature of conversion, the ability of the will, and the depth of the human dilemma will come to a deeper self-understanding and spiritual experience; (C) that the student will develop a critical faculty to judge Edwards’ use of Scripture and rational argument; (D) that the central concern of Edwards might become for us more than a theological phrase, that God’s glory be revealed in the conversion of sinners and that God’s glory be revealed in saintly living; (E) that the class might enjoy a time together of mutual study and dialogue. 2 semester hours. (Elective) The course number for this occasional elective does not designate the term in which it is offered.

PT610 Ministry in the PCA
Purpose: to provide preparation for licensure in the PCA, with focus on Bible, theology and church government examinations. Theological orientation related to the ‘good-faith’ creedal subscription of the PCA, and also to the preaching trajectory needed by the church today, will be taken up individually. 1 semester hour. (Elective)

PT620 Prayer in Holy Scripture and Church Tradition
This course is an introductory study of the vitally important subject of prayer. It focuses on what the Bible teaches concerning the nature and practice of prayer, while gleaning insights from church history, mainly the English Puritans – a movement primarily concerned with experimental subjects such as prayer. Its main objective is to deepen the student’s commitment to and practice of a life of prayer, both personal and corporate. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PT671 Ecclesiology, Women, and the Contemporary Church
Purpose: To affirm women’s place and role in the church; to explore the biblical teaching on women; to examine current trends on the teaching of women in the church; to help guide the student in ministering to women in the church. Topics covered include an understanding of the hermeneutical issues, a biblical understanding of male and female, the New Testament teaching on women’s role in the church, and practical consideration of how women can serve in the church. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PTC 251 Marriage Counseling
Purpose: to help students develop a rich, biblical-theological view of marriage and relationships that challenges popular goals for marriage/relationship counseling and provides powerful hope and direction; to provide students with conceptual and methodological tools for marriage counseling that are rooted in a biblical worldview of marriage and that recognize the unique challenges of marriage counseling; to interact with prevailing secular models of marriage counseling within a biblical worldview; to begin to develop the ability to offer relational skills within a larger context of heart change; to consider current marriage problem areas impacting the church. Topics covered include a biblical theological review of marriage and relationships; and an introduction to systems theory, gender differences, communication, and conflict. 3 semester hours.

PTC 261 Human Personality
Purpose: To deepen students’ understanding of biblical doctrine as it applies to the person; to examine what doctrines are especially important to apply in this generation; to understand how to apply biblical doctrine in personal ministry; to be able to uncover the implicit theology in other models of personal ministry and dialogue effectively about these issues. Topics covered include a review of systematic theological categories with a commitment to developing multiple applications, an examination of both Christian and non-Christian counseling case studies with an eye to enrich them with our theological work, and the practical application of a biblical-theological approach to the study of people. 3 semester hours. (M.A. Core)

PTE400 Research in Muslim Evangelism
Purpose: To know the history,theology,and culture of Islam; to prepare students to share their faith with Muslims; to be able to build a ministry that will reach out to Muslims. Topics covered in this course include the life of Mohammad,the history of Islam, the culture of Islam,Islamic theology,Islamic worldview, folk Islam, how to answer Muslims questions, witnessing to Muslims, and building a ministry to Muslims. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PTM151 Mission to the City
Purpose: To guide students in examining biblical principles as they are related to urban ministry; to examine and define urban ministry in missiological terms; to provide firsthand experience in terms of the significance of living, worshiping, and ministering in an urban context; to evaluate personal tension in cross-cultural situations; to present God’s interest in the cities of his world. This is an introductory course in the urban mission program. Topics covered include assumptions for winning the city; elements necessary for urban ministry; statistics and issues in urbanization; reasons for urban growth; understanding cities; anti-urban attitudes; biblical and theological interpretation of our perceptions; incarnation; biblical background to the city; pictures and motives of the city in the Bible; summary of urban dynamics; response to urban dynamics in relationship to ministry models; transitions and the urban church; pictures of the church; models of churches in the city; the minister in the city; and the importance of youth in the city. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PTM163 Church Growth and Church Planting
Purpose: To provide the student with various aspects of church growth methods, principles, and practices; to review a brief history of the School of Church Growth; to evaluate church growth principles and practices in order to become better equipped in the area of church growth ministries; to develop skills in relationship to growing a church. Topics covered include church growth philosophy, history of church growth, organic church growth, theological presuppositions, critique
of church growth, review of various urban models of church growth, and signs and wonders as a means to growth. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PTM462 Understanding the Islamic Challenge
Purpose: to look at the world of Islam, its beginning, its growth, and the doctrines of its major divisions; to examine the current movements and stresses in the Muslim community with the challenge they pose to the church; to suggest ways the church can meet today’s Islamic challenge. Topics covered include the development and demographic profile of various American Islamic communities as well as their international connections; Muslim immigrants; the American born descendants of these immigrants; American converts to Islam; and reasons behind the rapid growth of Islam today among Americans without a Muslim background. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PTM 572 The History and Theology of the African American Church
Purpose: To gain a better understanding of the African American church. Topics covered include the history, theology, and culture of the African American church. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PTM 650, 652 Cross-Cultural Missions Trip
Purpose: To give students experience in working with a team crossculturally; to help students determine their calling to cross-cultural ministry; to increase students’ vision for reaching the world.
Topics covered include pre-field orientation, cultural overviews of country to visit, and issues related to team ministry. 2 semester hours. (Elective)

PTM671 Urban Mission Seminar
Purpose: to guide students in the use of critical analysis when evaluating ministries or strategizing for new ministries; to provide opportunities for students to learn from the life experiences of other students; to present challenging situations facing those in ministry for students to evaluate in terms of theology, social sciences, and mission. Topics covered will change every semester so students can take the course more than once. These topics will include ministry models, mission case studies, reconciliation issues, and presentation of books for discussion. 1 semester hour. (Elective)

PTM681, 683 Perspectives on the World Christian Movement
Employing numerous speakers and multimedia presentations, this class will seek to educate and enlist the student to the cause of worldwide evangelism. The class is offered in conjunction with the international educational efforts of the U.S. Center for World Mission. 3 semester hours. (Elective)

M.A. COURSES (NOT APPLICABLE TO M.DIV./M.A.R. PROGRAMS)

OT 131 Biblical Theology I
Purpose: To show how responsible interpretation and application of any biblical text does not begin with the question “How do I apply this passage to my life?” but with “How does this passage connect to the great narrative of redemption which climaxes in the gospel, the story of Christ, and his people?” Topics covered include the nature of the Bible and its coherence; continuities and discontinuities in various major themes, such as the kingdom of God, definitions of the people of God, the Spirit and the New Covenant; the centrality of the gospel in application. Not available to M.Div. or M.A.R. students. 3 semester hours.

OT 141 Old Testament for Ministry
Purpose: To expose the student to specific interpretive issues in Old Testament historical and prophetic books; to demonstrate how Old Testament historical and prophetic books are to be interpreted and applied in light of the gospel; to engage in close reading and apply to specific books (Joshua and Jeremiah) the principles of biblical-theological interpretation learned in Biblical Theology I and Biblical Theology II. Topics covered include redemptive-historical interpretation and the question of application; critique of various popular methods of application of historical and prophetic literature; the nature of biblical history-writing; the office, function, and theology of the prophet in the Old Testament; the specific theologies and redemptive-historical trajectories of the books of Joshua and Jeremiah; and the use of Old Testament historical and prophetic literature in ministry. Prerequisites, OT 131, and NT 133. Not available to M.Div. or M.A.R. students. 3 semester hours.

NT 133 Biblical Theology II
For course description, see OT 131. Not available to M.Div. or M.A.R. students. 3 semester hours.

NT 143 New Testament for Ministry
Purpose: to examine some of the ways that New Testament writers applied the story of Jesus Christ to various problems confronting the first-century church; to develop responsible ways of applying the story of Jesus Christ to problems we face today. Topics covered include how the centrality of Jesus in the NT functions in relation to redemptive history, how that history applies to believers today, some major theological themes of the NT Gospels and Epistles, and the task of bridging the historical and cultural gap between the ancient and modern worlds. Not available to M.Div. or M.A.R. students. 3 semester hours.

ST 131 Survey of Reformed Theology
Purpose: To learn the basic doctrines upheld in mainstream Reformed theology; to grasp the coherency of the system; to understand the biblical basis for Reformed doctrine; to appreciate the distinctiveness of Reformed theology. Topics covered include the inspiration and authority of Scripture, covenant theology, creation of man in the image of God, the person and work of Christ, and the application of redemption in Christ. Not available to M.Div. or M.A.R. students. 3 semester hours.

CH 131 Survey of Church History
Purpose: To introduce students to the major movements and personalities of church history; to give students an understanding of why the church, its life, and its thought, developed in the manner it did; to enable students to begin critical reflection on the relationship of church history to contemporary Christianity. Topics covered will be drawn from all periods of church history, from the immediate post-apostolic period to the development of Christianity in the modern world. Not available to M.Div. or M.A.R. students. 3 semester hours.

PT 173 Biblical Interpretation
Purpose: To gain an overall framework for interpreting/applying any passage of Scripture, a framework that is sensitive to the reader’s world, the author’s world, and the text itself; to gain experience in seeing the Christological/Gospel-centered implications of any text as a prerequisite for meaningful personal application; to grow in ability to rivet Scriptural truth to real-life ministry situations; to practice biblical interpretation in the context of community. Topics covered include the problem of meaning, historical and contemporary models for the interpretation/application of Scripture, Bible translators, resources for Bible study, genre, and contemporary challenges in interpretation (including the role of the reader and the impact of culture in the process of interpretation). Not available to M.Div. or M.A.R. students. Prerequisites, OT 131. 3 semester hours.